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Dr Cara Wong

BSc USyd, PhD USyd, MClinNeuro Macq.

Associate Investigator

Contact Details

Phone : +61 2 9412 6783
email : cara.wong@nal.gov.au

External Address

National Acoustics Laboratories

Profile

I have diverse research background in social cognition, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), health psychology and clinical neuropsychology. I completed my PhD in psychology at The University of Sydney in 2012 for my thesis investigating social processing in the anterior temporal lobes using TMS. Following this I went on to complete a Masters in Clinical Neuropsychology at Macquarie University in 2014, and worked as a researcher/neuropsychologist at the Neuropsychology unit, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and the Healthy Brain Ageing Clinic, Brain and Mind Research Institute. Here I gained valuable experience in clinical assessment and cognitive rehabilitation of neurology patients and older adults with memory deficits. I recently joined the National Acoustic Laboratories (the research arm of Australian Hearing) in January 2015 to coordinate a new NHMRC and Hearing CRC funded project investigating whether early auditory speech discrimination in babies predicts later language skills. I am also interested in the psychosocial and cognitive outcomes of children with hearing impairment as part of the larger ‘Longitudinal Outcome of Children with Hearing Loss’ (LOCHI) study, and exploring the effects of hearing loss on social cognition (i.e. theory of mind and emotion recognition).

External Memberships

  • Member of the Australian Psychological Society
  • Member and student ambassador of the Australasian Society for the Study of Brain Impairment (ASSBI)

Awards

  • Winner of the Tasman Lovell Medallion for the best PhD Thesis in Psychology, The University of Sydney. (2012), Wong, C.
  • Winner of the Postgraduate Publication Prize, The University of Sydney (2012), Wong, C.
  • Winner of the Postgraduate Publication Prize, The University of Sydney (2011), Wong, C.

Selected Publications

Book Chapters

  • Teresa, Y.C., Ching, T., & Wong, C.L. (2017). Factors Influencing Child Developmental Outcomes in Auditory-Verbal Practice: Family-Centered Early Intervention. In E. Rhoades & J. Duncan (Eds.), Auditory-Verbal Practice: Family-Centered Early Intervention (2nd ed., pp. 103-113). Springfield, Illinois: Charles C Thomas Publishers.

Periodicals

  • Lester, K.J., Roberts, S., Keers, R., Coleman, J.R I., Breen, G., Wong, C.C.Y., Xu, X., Arendt, K., Blatter-Meunier, J., Bögels, S., Cooper, P., Creswell, C., Heiervang, E.R., Herren, C., Hogendoorn, S.M., Hudson, J.L., et al. (2016). Non-replication of the association between 5HTTLPR and response to psychological therapy for child anxiety disorders. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 208(2), 182-188. doi:10.1192/bjp.bp.114.154997
  • Wong, C.L., Ching, T.Y., Leigh, G., Cupples, L., Button, L., Marnane, V., Whitfield, J., Gunnourie, M., & Martin, L. (2016). Psychosocial development of 5-year-old children with hearing loss: Risks and protective factors. International Journal of Audiology. doi:10.1080/14992027.2016.1211764
  • Thayer, Z., Wong, C., Mohamed, A., & Miller, L. (2015). Improving memory in patients with epilepsy: Considering the impact of anti-epileptic drugs, low mood and/or surgery on memory training program outcomes. International Journal of Neurorehabilitation, 1(4), 139. doi:10.4172/2376-0281.1000139
  • Mullan, B, Wong, C, Davis, E, Todd, J, & Kothe, E. (2014). Food hygiene knowledge in adolescents and young adults. British Food Journal, 117(1), 50-61. doi:10.1108/BFJ-03-2013-0060
  • Mullan, B., Wong, C., Kothe, E., O'Moore, K., Pickles, K., & Sainsbury, K. (2014). An examination of the demographic predictors of adolescent breakfast consumption, content, and context. BMC Public Health, 14, 264.
  • Mullan, B., Wong, C., & Kothe, E. J. (2013). Predicting adolescents’ safe food handling using an extended theory of planned behavior. Food Control, 31, 2.
  • Mullan, B., Wong, C., & Kothe, E.J. (2013). Predicting adolescent breakfast consumption in the UK and Australia using an extended theory of planned behaviour. Appetite, 62, 1.
  • Mullan, B., Wong, C., Kothe, E., & Maccann, C. (2013). Predicting breakfast consumption: A comparison of the theory of planned behaviour and the health action process approach. British Food Journal, 115, 10.
  • Gallate, J., Wong, C.L., Ellwood, S., Roring, R., & Snyder, A. (2012). Creative people use nonconscious processes to their advantage. Creativity Research Journal, 24(2-3), 146-151.
  • Wong, C.L., & Gallate, J. (2012). The function of the anterior temporal lobe: A review of the empirical evidence. Brain Research, 1449, 94-116.
  • Wong, C.L., Harris, J., & Gallate, J. (2012). Evidence for a social function of the anterior temporal lobes: Low frequency rTMS reduces implicit gender stereotypes. Social Neuroscience, 7(1), 90-104.
  • Gallate, J., Wong, C.L., Ellwood, S., Chi, R., & Snyder, A. (2011). Noninvasive brain stimulation reduces prejudice scores on an implicit association test. Neuropsychologia, 25(2), 185-192.
  • Mullan, B,, Wong, C.L., Allom, V., & Pack, S.L. (2011). The role of executive function in bridging the intention-behaviour gap for binge-drinking in university students. Addictive Behaviors, 36, 1023-1026.
  • Wong, C.L, & Gallate, J. (2011). rTMS stimulation of the anterior temporal lobes does not dissociate social vs. non-social semantic knowledge. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 64(5), 855-870.

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Wong, C.L., Ching, T.Y.C., Leigh, G., Cupples, L., Marianne, V., Button, L., Whitfield, J., Gunnourie, M., & Martin, L. (2017, May). The psychosocial and language development of 5-year-old children using hearing aids or cochlear implants. Paper presented at the Speech Pathology Australia National Conference, Adelaide.
  • Wong, C.L., Leigh, G., Ching, T.Y.C., Cupples, L., Button, L., & Marianne, V. (2017, May). Psychosocial development hinges on good language and functional performance: Update on the LOCHI study. Paper presented at the 9th Australasian Newborn Hearing Screening Conference, Melbourne.
  • Huang, D., Wong, C., Radford, K., Say, M., Thayer, Z., & Miller, L.A. (2016, August). Use of strategies as a memory compensation technique in patients with acquired brain injury. Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Annual Workshop, The Fairmont Resort, Leura.
  • Van Dun, B., Ching, T., Wong, C., Xu Rattanasone, N., Bardy, F., Zhang, V., Sharma, M., Dillon, H., Demuth, K., & Rance, G. (2015, September). Assessment of infant speech discrimination using the acoustic change complex, a response from the auditory cortex. Paper presented at the Workshop on Infant Speech Perception (WISP): Phonological and Lexical Development, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Wong, C. & Miller, L. (2014, October). Beyond the taxi driver: Can spatial navigation in video games improve hippocampal functioning in memory impaired patients? Paper presented at the Memory in the Treetops Retreat, Avoca Beach.
  • Wong, C. & Miller, L. (2014, June). Beyond the taxi driver: Can playing video games involving spatial navigation improve memory and hippocampal functioning? Invited colloquium at the BMRI Regenerative Neuroscience Group Monthly Presentation, Sydney.
  • Wong, C. & Miller, L. (2014, April). Spatial navigation and the hippocampus: Can playing video games involving topographical environments help to rehabilitate memory? Colloquium at the Monthly meeting of the Human Brain Ageing Clinic, Brain Mind Research Institute, Sydney.
  • Wong, C. & Miller, L. (2013, December). Spatial navigation and the hippocampus: Can playing video games involving topographical environments help to rehabilitate memory? Symposium conducted at the Memory Day Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Wong, C. & Miller, L. (2013, October). Considering the evidence that virtual spatial navigation can help to rehabilitate memory: Where do we go from here? Symposium conducted at the Memory Program Symposium, Sydney.
  • Wong, C.L. (2011, July). Brain stimulation to the anterior temporal lobes reduces gender stereotypes. Paper presented at the 16th European Association of Social Psychology (EASP) General Meeting, Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Wong, C.L. (2011, April). Evidence for a social function of the anterior temporal lobe: Low frequency rTMS reduces implicit gender stereotypes. Paper presented at the Society of Australasian Social Psychologists Conference, Sydney.

Further Information

Contact Details

Telephone: +61 2 9850 4127
Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
Web : www.ccd.edu.au

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