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Dr David Lick

BA UVA, MA UCLA, PhD UCLA.

Associate Investigator

Contact Details

email : dl136@nyu.edu

External Address

Department of Psychology,
New York University, USA

Profile

First impressions matter. Indeed, anyone who has attended a job interview, a theater audition, or a blind date can attest to the often profound implications of the split-second judgments others make about us. I study how these judgments become negatively biased on the basis of limited information. For example, in one line of work, I seek to understand how visual cues in the face and body give rise to social categorizations associated with prejudice. In other work, I examine how fluency - the ease with which perceivers can judge a social target - guides first impressions. Most recently, I have begun to probe how visual experience guides the formation of human preferences and prejudices. Specifically, I have shown that several minutes of visual exposure to stigmatized group members reliably reduces prejudice against other members of that group.

In summary, my research combines theories and methods from social, cognitive, and vision science to understand how and why perceptual processes predict interpersonal evaluations. In time, I hope this work will contribute new theoretical information about the deep psychological roots of impression formation while simultaneously highlighting novel pathways for reducing bias.

Awards

  • National Science Foundation (2015), Lick, D.J. East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute
  • University of California, Los Angles, USA (2015), Lick, D.J. Shelley E. Taylor Dissertation Award
  • American Psychological Association of Graduate Students (2015), Lick, D.J. Basic and Applied Research Grant
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2014), Lick, D.J. Clara Mayo Grant
  • American Psychological Foundation (2014), Lick, D.J. Wayne F. Placek Grant
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (2014), Lick, D.J. Graduate Student Travel Award
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2014), Lick, D.J. Finalist, Student Poster Award
  • International Academy of Sex Research (2013), Lick, D.J. Student Research Development Award
  • Ohio Psychological Association (2013), Lick, D.J. Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2013), Lick, D.J. Finalist, Outstanding Researcher Award
  • Society for Personality and Social Psychology (2012), Lick, D.J. Diversity Student Travel Award
  • American Psychological Association (2012), Lick, D.J. Finalist, Wayne F. Placek Grant
  • International Academy of Sex Research (2011), Lick, D.J. Best Student Poster Presentation
  • National Science Foundation (2011), Lick, D.J. Graduate Research Fellowship
  • University of California, Los Angeles (2011), Lick, D.J. Eugene V. Cota-Robles Diversity Fellowship
  • University of California, Los Angeles (2011), Lick, D.J. Chancellor’s Prize
  • University of California, Los Angeles (2011), Lick, D.J. University Fellowship

Recent Grants Awarded

  • National Science Foundation East Asia and Pacific Summer Institute (2015) “Perceptual fluency as a mechanism for enhancing evaluations following visual adaptation.” Lick, D.J.
  • APA Basic Psychological Science Research Grant (2015) “Does seeing diversity - believing diversity? The impact of diversity advertising on students’ evaluations of university climate.” [USD 1000] Lick, D.J. ($1,400)
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) Clara Mayo Grant (2014) “Recalibrating body perception: Harnessing visual aftereffects to reduce anti-fat bias.” [USD 500] Lick, D.J. ($700)
  • APF Wayne F Placek Grant (2014) “An experimental test of minority stress theory: Immediate physiological functioning and downstream physical health outcomes among lesbians and gay men who face identity-related stigma.” [USD 1500] Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L. & Robles, T.F. ($2,000)
  • International Academy of Sex Research (IASR) Student Research Development Award (2013) “The psychological implications of being an ally: Affective, behavioral, and physiological responses of LGB individuals and straight allies following experiences with antigay prejudice.” [USD 500] Lick, D.J. ($700)
  • Michael Sullivan Diversity Scholarship (2013) “Recalibrating gender perception: Adaptation aftereffects as a method for reducing prejudice against gender-atypical women.” [USD 500] Lick, D.J. ($700)
  • Janet Hyde Student Research Grant (APA Div. 35) (2012) “Recalibrating gender perception: Adaptation aftereffects as a method of reducing prejudice against gender-atypical women.” [USD 500] Lick, D.J. ($700)
  • Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues (SPSSI) Grants-in-Aid Funding Award (2011) “Physiological stress responses following gay-related prejudice.” [USD 500] Lick, D.J. ($700)
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (2011) Lick, D.J.

Selected Publications

Periodicals

  • Lick, D.J., Cortland, C.I., & Johnson, K.L. (2016). The pupils are the windows to sexuality: Pupil dilation as a visual cue to others’ sexual interest. Evolution and Human Behavior, 37(2), 117-124. doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2015.09.004
  • Johnson, K.L., Lick, D.J., & Carpinella, C.M. (2015). Emergent research in social vision: An integrated approach to the determinants and consequences of social categorization. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 9, 15-30. doi:10.1111/spc3.12147
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2015). Intersecting race and gender cues are associated with perceptions of gay men’s preferred sexual roles. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 44, 1471-1481.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2015). The interpersonal consequences of processing ease: Fluency as a metacognitive foundation for prejudice. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 24, 143-148. doi:10.1177/0963721414558116
  • Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L., & Riskind, R.G. (2015). Haven’t I seen you before? Straight men are vigilant to gender-atypical faces, especially when their masculinity is threatened. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 18, 131-152. doi:10.1177/1368430214538324
  • Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L., & Rule, N.O. (2015). Disfluent processing helps to explain anti-bisexual prejudice. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 39(3), 257-288. doi:10.1007/s10919-015-0211-y
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014). Lick, D. J., & Johnson, K. L. (2014). “You can’t tell just by looking!” Beliefs in the diagnosticity of visual cues predict response biases in social categorization. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40, 1494-1506.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014). Perceptual roots of antigay prejudice: Negative evaluations of sexual minority targets arise early in person perception on the basis of visibly gendered features. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 40(9), 1178-1192.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014). Recalibrating gender perception: Face aftereffects and the perceptual underpinnings of gender-related biases in social perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 1259-1276.
  • Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L., & Gill, S.V. (2014). Why do they have to flaunt it? Perceptions of communicative intent explain antigay prejudice based upon brief exposure to nonverbal cues. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 5(8), 927-935. doi:10.1177/1948550614537311
  • Lick, D.J. & Durso, L.E., & Johnson, K.L. (2013). Minority stress and physical health among sexual minorities. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 8(5), 521-548.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013). Fluency of visual processing explains prejudiced evaluations following categorization of concealable identities. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology,, 49(3), 419-425.
  • Lick, D.J., Carpinella, C. M., Preciado, M.A., Spunt, R.P., & Johnson, K.L. (2013). Reverse-correlating mental representations of sex-typed bodies: The impact of number of trials on image quality. Frontiers in Perception Science, 4, 476.
  • Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L., & Gill, S.V. (2013). Deliberate changes to gendered body motion influence basic social perceptions. Social Cognition, 31(6), 657-672.
  • Lick, D.J., Patterson, C.J., & Schmidt, K.M. (2013). Recalled social experiences and current psychological adjustment among adults reared by gay and lesbian parents. Journal of GLBT Family Studies, 9(3), 230-253.
  • Lick, D.J., Tornello, S. L., Riskind, R.G., Schmidt, K.M., & Patterson, C.J. (2012). Social climate for sexual minorities predicts well-being among heterosexual offspring of lesbian and gay parents. Sexuality Research and Social Policy, 9(2), 99-112.
  • Lick, D.J., Schmidt, K.M., & Patterson, C.J. (2011). The Rainbow Families Scale (RFS): A measure of social experiences among individuals with lesbian and gay parents. Journal of Applied Measurement, 12(3), 222-241.

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Lick, D.J. (2015, July). Prejudice is in the eye of the beholder: Some perceptual underpinnings of interpersonal bias. Colloquium at the UWA Perception Lab, Perth.
  • Hernandez, B., Lick, D.J., Johnson, K.L., & Robles, T. (2015, May). The impact of antigay bias on the physical health of gay men and lesbians. Poster session presented at the UCLA Undergraduate Research Week, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J. (2015, May). Prejudice is in the eye of the beholder: Some perceptual underpinnings of interpersonal bias. Colloquium at the UCLA Social Psychology Lecture Series, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J. (2015, April). Prejudice is in the eye of the beholder: An interdisciplinary approach to prejudice reduction. Colloquium at the UCLA GradSlam Competition, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J. (2015, February). Visual context molds perceivers’ attitudes toward stigmatised social groups. Poster session presented at the 16th Annual Convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, USA.
  • Stroessner, S.J., Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2015, February). Social context and sexual orientation perception. Paper presented at the 16th Annual Convention of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Long Beach, USA.
  • Anderson, E., McCormack, M., Ripley, M., Lick, D.J., Adams, A., Morris, M., & Rivers, I. (2014, August). When is bisexual not really bisexual? Men, decreasing homohysteria, and same-sex kissing. Paper presented at the American Psychological Association Annual Convention, Washington, USA.
  • Stroessner, S.J., Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, August). Is he gay? It depends on where he’s from. Social context and the categorization of perceptually ambiguous groups. Paper presented at the 26th Annual Duck Conference on Social Cognition, Duck, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, July). Visual exposure molds perceivers’ attitudes toward stigmatized groups. Poster session presented at the Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Person Perception, Dartmouth, USA.
  • Lick, D J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, June). Recalibrating gender perception: Visual adaptation as a prejudice reduction technique. Paper presented at the 10th Biennial Convention of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Portland, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, May). Visually-mediated prejudice against lesbian women: Causes, correlates, and mitigating factors. Paper presented at the Underrepresented Graduate Students in Psychology Conference, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., Hunger, J.M., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, May). Recalibrating body perception: Visual exposure shifts fat category thresholds. Colloquium at the Obesity Stigma Symposium, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Anderson, E., Ripley, M., & Lick, D.J. (2014, March). Betrayed by a kiss: Contesting orthodox notions of undergraduate American masculinity. Paper presented at the Pacific Sociological Association 85th Annual Meeting, Portland, USA.
  • Almaraz, S.M., Lick, D.J., Cortland, C.I., Shapiro, J.R., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, February). Straight until proven gay: Motivated bias in sexual orientation categorization. Poster session presented at the 15th Annual Meeting of Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, February). Recalibrating gender perception: Visual adaptation as a novel method of prejudice reduction. Paper presented at the Group Processes and Intergroup Relations (GPIR) Preconference, Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., Golay, A.E., & Johnson, K.L. (2014, February). Race categorizations drawn from dynamic body motions: Accuracy, heuristics, and intersectional biases. Poster session presented at the 15th Annual Meeting of Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, USA.
  • Lick, D. J., & Johnson, K. L. (2013, December). Antigay prejudice: From perceptual causes to health consequences. Paper presented at the UCLA Health Psychology Lecture Series, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013, October). This boy is a bottom (especially if he’s Asian): Social psychological insights on the stereotypes guiding perceptions of gay men's preferred sexual roles. Paper presented at the “What We Talk About, When We Talk About Queer”, UCLA LGBT Studies Symposium, Los Angles, USA.
  • Johnson, K.L., & Lick, D.J. (2013, September). Cautious, contemplative, and consequential categorizations: Insights from the visual perception of concealable group membership. Paper presented at the Society of Experimental Social Psychology Conference, Berkeley, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013, August). This boy is a bottom (especially if he’s Asian): Perceptions of gay men’s preferred sexual positions are driven by overlapping race and gender phenotypes. Paper presented at the International Academy of Sex Research, Chicago, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013, May). Deliberate changes to gendered body motions influence the accuracy of basic social perceptions. Paper presented at the 26th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013, January). Visual aftereffects shift attitudes related to men’s and women’s gendered facial appearances. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., & Johnson, K.L. (2013, January). Deliberate changes to gendered body motions influence basic social perceptions. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, New Orleans, USA.
  • Lick, D.J. & Johnson, K.L. (2012, June). Essentialist beliefs about homosexuality predict sexual orientation categorizations. Paper presented at the 9th Biennial Convention of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, Charlotte, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., Tornello, S.L., Riskind, R.G., & Patterson, C.J. (2012, January). Social climate predicts psychological adjustment for heterosexual children of gay fathers. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., Patterson, C.J., Schmidt, K.M., & Riskind, R.G. (2011, August). Social climate predicts psychological adjustment for children of lesbian and gay parents. Poster session presented at the International Academy of Sex Research, Los Angeles, USA.
  • Lick, D.J., Patterson, C.J., & Schmidt, K.M. (2011, May). “It gets better:” Recalled stigma, benefits, and openness among offspring of lesbian and gay parents. Poster session presented at the 23rd Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, USA.

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Telephone: +61 2 9850 4127
Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
Web : www.ccd.edu.au

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