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Professor William Hayward

BA UC, MA UC, MSc/MPhil Yale, PhD Yale.

Partner Investigator

Contact Details

Phone : +649 9238516
email : w.hayward@auckland.ac.nz
Homepage : http://www.psych.auckland.ac.nz/en/about/our-staff/academic-staff/douglas-elliffe1.html

External Address

School of Psychology
The University of Auckland, NZ

Profile

I’m originally from Christchurch, and obtained my BA and MA in Psychology from the University of Canterbury. I then went to the US, and obtained my PhD from Yale University, before heading back to the Southern Hemisphere to take a lecturing position at the University of Wollongong, Australia. I have spent the last 14 years in Asia, where I taught first at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and then at the University of Hong Kong, where I was Head of the Department of Psychology. In January 2014 I took the position of Head of the School of Psychology at the University of Auckland.

My primary research interests are in the area of Visual Cognition, which lies at the intersection of perception and memory. How do we make sense of the world that we see and hear? We need to encode key aspects of the perceptual world, and then determine how they relate to information that we already possess. I have a number of research projects within this field.

1. Face perception. The human face contains a wealth of information, including identity, expression, gender, and ethnicity. In my lab we study a number of issues related to how we understand these characteristics, particularly in terms of identity and ethnicity. We are interested in the way that faces seem to be processed as a whole unit, also known as “holistic processing”, and whether this is related to our ability to identify them or place them in social groups. We also examine the eye-tracking patterns of people when they look at faces, and how they may differ when people look at different kinds of faces.

2. Perception of rotated objects. We effortlessly recognize objects around us, but each object can project a myriad of different appearances to us. How do we learn to recognize 3D objects over a wide range of different sizes, colours, and viewpoints? In my lab we use a variety of techniques for trying to understand the way in which object information is encoded by the brain.

3. Visual attention. The world contains far too much visual information for us to process it all, so the brain needs to select that information that seems most useful and important at any instant. The way in which it does this selection is still poorly understood. I’m interested in the principles underlying attentional selection, and the way in which they are affected by other visual attributes.

Recent External Appointments

  • Associate Editor, British Journal of Psychology. (2013 continuing)
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. (2013 continuing)
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. (2011 continuing)
  • Editorial Board, Frontiers in Perception Science. (2011 continuing)
  • Associate Editor, Visual Cognition. (2009 continuing)
  • Editorial Board, Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. (2007 continuing)

External Memberships

  • Vision Sciences Society
  • Psychonomic Society

Recent Grants Awarded

  • Hong Kong Research Grants Council (2012 - 2014) "Recollection and familiarity for rotated objects." Hayward, W. ($340,458)
  • Hong Kong Research Grants Council (2011 - 2014) "Understanding the basis for the own-race advantage in face recognition." Hayward, W. ($903,660)
  • Hong Kong University (2011 - 2013) "Visual processing deficit markers in schizophrenia."(HKD95,000) Hayward, W. ($13,755)
  • Hong Kong Research Grants Council (General Research Fund) (2011 - 2014) "Understanding the basis for the own-race advantage in face recognition." Hayward, W., Caldara, R., & Rhodes, G. ($123,977)
  • Hong Kong Research Grants Council (2009 - 2012) "Mechanisms of visual attention in detection and localization of objects." Hayward, W. ($873,480)

Media Engagement

Selected Publications

Periodicals

  • Chuk, T., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J.H. (2017). Hidden Markov model analysis reveals the advantage of analytic eye movement patterns in face recognition across cultures. Cognition, 169, 102-117. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2017.08.003
  • Hayward, W.G., Favelle, S.K., Oxner, M., Chu, M.H., & Lam, S.M. (2017). The other-race effect in face learning: Using naturalistic images to investigate face ethnicity effects in a learning paradigm. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 5, 890-896. doi:10.1080/17470218.2016.1146781
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., Chu, M.H., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2016). Holistic processing of face configurations and components. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42(10), 1482-1489. doi:10.1037/xhp0000246
  • Cristino, F., Davitt, L., Hayward, W.G., & Leek, E.C. (2015). Stereo disparity facilitates view generalization during shape recognition for solid multipart objects. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 68(12), 2419-2436. doi:10.1080/17470218.2015.1017512
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W.G., Oxner, M., Pond, S., & Rhodes, G. (2015). How well do computer-generated faces tap face expertise? PLoS One, 10(11), e0141353. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0141353
  • Harrison, S.A., Gauthier, I., Hayward, W.G., & Richler, J.J. (2014). Other-race effects manifest in overall performance, not qualitative processing style. Visual Cognition, 22(6), 843-864. doi:10.1080/13506285.2014.918912
  • Rhodes, G., Jeffery, L., Taylor, E., Hayward, W.G., & Ewing, L. (2014). Individual differences in adaptive coding of face identity are linked to individual differences in face recognition ability. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 40(3), 897-903. doi:10.1037/a0035939
  • Zhao, M., Cheung, S., Wong, A.C.-N., Rhodes, G., Chan, E.K.S., Chan, W.W.L., & Hayward, W.G. (2014). Processing of configural and componential information in face-selective cortical areas. Cognitive Neuroscience, 5(3-4), 160-167. doi:10.1080/17588928.2014.912207
  • Zhao, M., Hayward, W.G., & Bulthoff, I. (2014). Face format at encoding affects the other-race effect in face memory. Journal of Vision, 14(9), 6. doi:10.1167/14.9.6
  • Crookes, K., Favelle, S., & Hayward, W.G. (2013). Holistic processing for other-race faces in Chinese participants occurs for upright but not inverted faces. Frontiers in Psychology, 4, 29.
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2013). The other-race effect: Holistic coding differences and beyond. Visual Cognition, 21(9-10), 1224-1247. doi:10.1080/13506285.2013.824530
  • Chan, L.K.H., & Hayward, W.G. (2012). Dimension-specific signal modulation in visual search: Evidence from inter-stimulus surround suppression. Journal of Vision, 12(4), 10.
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2012). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts sensitivity to vertical over horizontal changes in eye position. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 38(6), 1428. doi:10.1037/a0027943
  • Harris, I.M., Murray, A.M., Hayward, W.G., O’Callaghan, C., & Andrews, S. (2012). Repetition blindness reveals differences between the representations of manipulable and non-manipulable objects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 38(5), 1228-1241. doi:10.1037/a0029035
  • Hayward, W.G. (2012). Whatever happened to object-centered representations? Perception, 41, 1153-1162.
  • Zhang, L., Zhou, G., Pu, X., & Hayward, W.G. (2011). Inconsistent individual personality description eliminates the other-race effect. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 18, 870-876.
  • Mondloch, C.J., Elms, N., Maurer, D., Rhodes, G., Hayward, W.H., Tanaka, J.W., & Zhou, G. (2010). Processes underlying the cross-race effect: An investigation of holistic, featural and relational processing of own- versus other-race faces. Perception, 39, 1065-1085.
  • Rhodes, G., Ewing, L., Hayward, W., Maurer, D., Mondloch, C., & Tanaka, J. (2009). Contact and other-race effects in configural and component processing of faces. British Journal of Psychology, 100, 717-728.
  • Hayward, W.G., Rhodes, G., & Schwaninger, A. (2008). An own-race advantage for components as well as configurations in face recognition. Cognition, 106(2), 1017-1027. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2007.04.002
  • Jaquet, E., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2008). Race-contingent aftereffects suggest distinct perceptual norms for different race faces. Visual Cognition, 16(6), 734-753. doi:10.1080/13506280701350647
  • Jaquet, E., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2007). Opposite aftereffects for Chinese and Caucasian faces are selective for social category information and not just physical face differences. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 60(11), 1457-1467. doi:10.1080/17470210701467870
  • McKone, E., Brewer, J.L., MacPherson, S., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2007). Familiar other-race faces show normal holistic processing and are robust to perceptual stress. Perception, 36(2), 224-228. doi:10.1068/p5499
  • Rhodes, G., Hayward, W.G., & Winkler, C. (2006). Expert face coding: Configural and component coding of own-race and other-race faces. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 13(3), 499-505. doi:10.3758/BF03193876
  • Zhou, G., Fu, X., Hayward, W. G., Locke, V., & Pellicano, E (2005). Diagnosticity principle and culture difference Journal of Culture and Cognition, 5, 240-247.
  • Curby, K.M., Hayward, W.G., & Gauthier, I. (2004). Laterality effects in the recognition of depth-rotated novel objects. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 4(1), 100-111.

Published Abstracts

  • Chuk, T., Luo, A.X., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J. (2014). Caucasian and Asian eye movement patterns in face recognition: A computational exploration using hidden Markov models [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 14(10), 1212. doi:10.1167/14.10.1212
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S., & Rhodes, G. (2014). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 14(10), 819. doi:10.1167/14.10.819
  • Hayward, W.G., Lao, J., Cheng, Z., Crookes, K., Liu, T.T., & Caldara, R. (2013). Eye movements for scrambled faces [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 13(9), 398.
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2012). Race differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 12(9), 988. doi:10.1167/12.9.988
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2011). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal, not long-range versus short-range, spatial relations [Abstract]. iPerception, 2(4), 237.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W. G., & Favelle, S. (2011). No own-­?race advantage for holistic face processing in Chinese participants [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 11(11), 624.
  • Hayward, W. G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S., & Rhodes, G. (2011). Why are face composites difficult to recognize? [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 11(11), 668.

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S. & Rhodes, G. (2015, March). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise. Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders International Person Perception Workshop, Perth.
  • Hayward, W. (2014, August). The other-race effect: A window on disorders of face perception? Paper presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Chuk, T., Luo, A.X., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J. (2014, May). Caucasian and Asian eye movement patterns in face recognition: A computational exploration using hidden Markov models. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), St Pete Beach, USA.
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S. & Rhodes, G. (2014, May). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), St Pete Beach, USA.
  • Hayward, W.G., Lao, J., Cheng, Z., Crookes, K., Liu, T.T., & Caldara, R. (2013, May). Eye movements for scrambled faces. Poster session presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Crookes, K., Lao, J., Caldara, R., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2013, April). On the nose: Cultural differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces. Paper presented at the 40th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Adelaide.
  • Crookes, K., Lao, J., Caldara, R., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2013, April). On the nose: Cultural differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces. Colloquium at the School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
  • Rhodes, G., Jeffery, L., Taylor, L., Hayward, W.G., & Ewing, L. (2013, April). Adaptive face-coding mechanisms are linked to face expertise: Evidence from individual differences in face identity aftereffects. Paper presented at the 40th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Adelaide.
  • Hayward, W.G. (2012, September). Using recollection and familiarity to investigate view generalization in object recognition. Paper presented at the 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP), Alghero, Italy.
  • Hayward, W.G., Zhao, M., Cheung, S.-H., Wong, A. C.-N., Rhodes, G., Chan, E.K.S., & Chan, W. (2012, June). Perception of configural and component information in own-race and other-race faces: An fMRI study. Poster session presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Beijing, China.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Lao, J. & Caldara, R. (2012, May). Race differences in eye-movements to three-quarter view faces. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Hayward, W.G. (2012, May). Recollection and familiarity for rotated objects. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Liu, T., & Hayward, W.G. (2012, May). Interactions between space-, surface-, and object-based attention. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Patterson, C., Cristino, F., Hayward, W.G., & Leek, C. (2012, May). Stereo information benefits view generalization in object recognition. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Hayward, W.G. (2011, October). What is the cause of the other-race advantage in face processing? Invited colloquium at the Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University.
  • Hayward, W.G. (2011, September). Is the other-race effect due to perception or memory? Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, University of Western Australia.
  • Chan, L.K.H., & Hayward, W.G. (2011, July). Dissociating goal-directed and stimulus-driven determinants in attentional capture. Paper presented at the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Hong Kong.
  • Crookes, K. & Hayward, W. G. (2011, July). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal not long-range versus short-range spatial relations. Poster session presented at the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Hong Kong.
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2011, July). Does the own-race advantage in face processing have a basis in holistic processing? Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Memory (ICOM5), York, UK.
  • Liu, T., Hayward, W.G., & McCarley, J.S. (2011, July). On the relationship between space- and object-based attention. Paper presented at the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Hong Kong.
  • Zhang, W., & Hayward, W.G. (2011, July). The effect of perceptual expertise on visual short-term memory. Paper presented at the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Hong Kong.
  • Chan, L.K.H., & Hayward, W.G. (2011, May). How do people quit visual search? Justifications for a deadline model. Paper presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL, USA.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W. G., & Favelle, S. (2011, May). No own-race advantage for holistic face processing in Chinese participants. Poster session presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, USA.
  • Harrison, S.A., Richler, J.J., Mack, M.L., Palmeri, T.J., Hayward, W.G., & Gauthier, I. (2011, May). The complete design lets you see the whole picture: Differences in holistic processing contribute to face-inversion and other-race effects. Paper presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL, USA.
  • Hayward, W. G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2011, May). Why are face composites difficult to recognize? Poster session presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Zhang, W., & Hayward, W.G. (2011, May). The effect of perceptual expertise on visual short-term memory. Paper presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, FL, USA.
  • Crookes, K. & Hayward, W. G. (2010, July). Holistic processing in Asia: Exploring the part-whole effect in Chinese participants. Paper presented at the Hong Kong University International Workshop on Visual Cognition, Hong Kong.
  • Hayward, W.G., Zhao, M., Cheung, O., Rhodes, G., & Gauthier, I. (2009, May). Dissociating contributions of configural and component information to the own-race advantage in face recognition. Poster session presented at the Vision Sciences Society, Florida.
  • Hayward, W.G., Zhao, M., & Rhodes, G. (2008, July). Configural and component processing of own-race and other-race face. Invited paper presented at the Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Brisbane, Australia.
  • Elms, N., Mondloch, C.J., Maurer, D., Hayward, W.G., Rhodes, G., Tanaka, J., & Zhou, G. (2008, May). Other-race faces: Limitations of expert face processing. Poster session presented at the Vision Sciences Society, Florida.
  • Jaquet, E., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2008, May). It’s more than just physical: The contribution of social category information to race-selective face aftereffects. Poster session presented at the Vision Sciences Society, Florida.
  • Jaquet, E., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W. (2006, May). Figural aftereffects transfer, but are also contingent on, race categories. Poster session presented at the Vision Sciences Society, Florida.
  • Hayward, W., Rhodes, G., Schwaninger, A., & Winkler, C. (2005, May). Own-race face effects in processing of configural and component information by Chinese participants. Paper presented at the VSS, Sarasota, Florida.
  • Curby, K.M., Hayward, W.G., & Gauthier, I. (2002, November). Left-hemisphere viewpoint-independent recognition depends on semantic information. Poster session presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Kansas City, USA.
  • Palermo, R. & Hayward, W. (1998, October). Effects of verbalisation and expertise on object recognition. Poster session presented at the The University of Western Australia Psychology Conference, Perth.

Further Information

Contact Details

Telephone: +61 2 9850 4127
Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
Web : www.ccd.edu.au

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