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Professor Elizabeth (Liz) Pellicano

BSc UWA, PhD UWA, MPsych UWA.

Partner Investigator

Contact Details

Phone : +44 20 7331 5140
Fax : +44 20 7612 6304
email : l.pellicano@ucl.ac.uk
Homepage : https://www.ioe.ac.uk/about/policiesProcedures/27039.html
ORCID : http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7246-8003

External Address

Department of Psychology and Human Development
UCL Institute of Education, University College London, UK

Profile

I trained as an educational psychologist in Perth, Australia, where I also completed my PhD on the cognitive profile of children with autism, before becoming a Research Fellow in Psychiatry at the University of Oxford, UK. I am Professor of Autism Education and Director of the Centre for Research in Autism and Education (CRAE) at the UCL Institute of Education, University College London.

I am a developmental cognitive scientist and educational psychologist. I am committed to understanding the distinctive opportunities and challenges faced by autistic children, young people and adults, and tracing their impact on everyday life – at home, at school and out-and-about in the community. I am also dedicated both to ensuring that the outcomes of my research are as influential as possible in education policy-making and to enhancing public understanding of autism, its challenges and opportunities.

Recent External Appointments

  • Director, The Centre for Research in Autism and Education. (2013 continuing)
  • Advisory Group Member, Ambitious about Autism Peer Awareness programme. (2012 - 2013)
  • Steering Group Member, Assistive learning technologies for the Centre for Research into Assistive Learning Technologies, Kellogg College, University of Oxford, UK. (2012 continuing)
  • External Advisory Group Member, Ambitious about Autism UK. (2012 continuing)
  • Editor, Autism. (2011 continuing)
  • Editorial Board, Journal of Experimental Child Psychology. (2011 continuing)

External Memberships

  • Experimental Psychology Society (EPS), UK
  • British Psychology Society (BPS), UK
  • Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD)
  • International Society for Autism Research (INSAR)
  • National Autistic Society (NAS), UK
  • American Political Science Association

Awards

  • Philip Leverhulme Prize (2015), Pellicano, E. The Leverhulme Trust, which recognises the achievement of outstanding researchers whose work has already attracted international recognition and whose future career is exceptionally promising. £100,000.
  • Director’s Prize for Excellence in Public Engagement in Research (2014), Pellicano, E. Staff or team member considered to have made the most exceptional and sustained contribution to the life and work of the IOE through furthering public engagement with its research.
  • 2007 Michael Young Prize (2007), Pellicano, E. The prize aims to reward and encourage early career researchers whose work offers genuine new insights and is likely to have an impact beyond academia
  • Neil O’Connor Award (2006), Pellicano, E. outstanding contribution to research on developmental disability
  • Best biological dissertation (2005), Pellicano, E. International Society for Autism Research

Recent Grants Awarded

  • Autistica (2016 - 2017) "Deutsche Bank workplace internships: Proof of concept." (£8,735) Pellicano, E., & Remington, A. ($15,320)
  • European Commission (2016 - 2020) "DE-ENIGMA: Multi-modal HRI for expanding social imagination in autistic children." (€3,904,188) Pellicano, E., Evers, V., Pantic, M., Schuller, B., Sminchisescu, C., Petrovic, S., & Baranger, A. ($8,442,510)
  • Office of the Children’s Commissioner, England. (2014) "Research into the views and experiences of children and young people in residential special schools." £36,210 Pellicano, E., & Hill, V. ($64,480)
  • IOE Next Generation Initiatives Fund (2014 - 2015) TESSA: UK-India intercultural knowledge transfer in technology-enhanced school and home support for autism spectrum conditions. £26,708 Pellicano, E., & Porayksa-Pomsta, K. ($57,684)
  • HEIF Major Initiatives Fund (2014 - 2015) "Delivering support to ‘hard-to-reach’ families of children with autism: Understanding the support that best meets their needs." £10,043 Pellicano, E., Barratt, P., Ashcroft, E., Greathead, S., & Milton, D. ($29,619)
  • ESRC Research Seminars Competition (2014 - 2016) "New directions for UK autism research."£29,868 Pellicano, E., Charman, T., Leekam, S., Fletcher-Watson, S., Parr, J., Beresford, P., & Milton, D. ($64,500)
  • Institute of Education, University College London Incubator Fund (2014) "Pilot study to understand child behaviour and development in Nepali and UK children: Qualitative study of parents and professionals." £2,000 Pellicano, E., Heys, M., & Costello, A. ($3,560)
  • Waterloo Foundation (2013 - 2014) "A feasibility study of the NAS EarlyBird parenting programme." (£41,696). Charman, T., & Pellicano, E.
  • Experimental Psychology Society (2013) “Noisy brains? The role of internal noise in typical and atypical development.” Pellicano, E., & Manning, C. ($2,564)
  • Institute of Education University of London and University College London Strategic Partnership Research Innovation Fund (2013 - 2014) "A feasibility study on the effectiveness of yoga therapy for pupils with autism." Pellicano, E., Hailes, S., & Costello, A. ($25,556)
  • Institute of Education (IOE), University of London Higher Education Innovation Funding (HEIF) Next Generation Fund (2013 - 2015) "Developing technology industry links for medical- and education-related apps via an IOE-SME collaboration on persuasive mobile tech for emotional regulation." Pellicano, E., Mintz, J., & Price, S. ($32,561)
  • Bloomsbury Colleges PhD Studentship (2013 - 2016) "Culture and autism: How cultural norms shape the neurocognitive development and societal understanding of autism." Senju, A., & Pellicano, E. ($98,319)
  • Medical Research Council (2012 - 2015) ""I do not see the world as others do." Diminished perceptual adaptation, hypo-priors and autism." (£583,132). Pellicano, E., & Burr, D. ($1,084,488)
  • Inge Wakehurst Trust, Charles Wolfson Foundation, and Waterloo Foundation (2012 - 2013) "Re-mapping autism research." (£70,561). Pellicano, E., Charman, T., & Research Autism. ($131,227)
  • Bloomsbury Colleges PhD Studentship (2011 - 2014) "Mechanisms of social influence in typical development and autism." (£57,000). Pellicano, E., & Bird, G. ($106,006)
  • Nuffield Foundation Social Science Small Grant Scheme (2011) "Number sense in autism."(£14,936). Pellicano, E., & Burr, D.
  • Department of Education Autism Education Trust (2011) "What is good practice in autism education?" Pellicano, E., Charman, T., & Dockrell, J.
  • Department of Education Autism Education Trust (2011) "Planning meaningful outcomes for children and young people on the autism spectrum." Pellicano, E., Wittemeyer, K., Guldberg, K., Macnab, N., Charman, T., Parsons, S., Howlin, P., Slonims, V., Hastings, R., & Cusack, J.
  • VolkswagenStiftung (2010 - 2012) "Social conformity: why do humans and monkeys make weak decisions under social influence." (€398,000). Krug, K., & Mojzisch, A., & Pellicano, E.
  • Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Quota Award (2010 - 2013) "Probing the sensory atypicalities in autism." (£56,500). Pellicano, E. ($105,077)
  • ARC Discovery Project Grant and Australian Professorial Fellowship [DP0877379] (2008 - 2012) "Adaptive processes in normal and disordered face perception." Rhodes, G., Pellicano, E., & Leopold, D.A. ($739,500)

Media Engagement

Selected Publications

Book Chapters

  • Cowan, R., & Pellicano, E. (2014). Autism, special needs and mathematics learning. In S. Lerman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Mathematics Dducation (pp. 54-56). London, UK: Springer.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012). Autism: Beyond weak central coherence. In J. Burack, N. Fox, & J. Enns (Eds.), Cognitive Neuroscience, Development, and Psychopathology. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012). Emotional intelligence. In F.R. Volkmar (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Berlin, Germany: Springer.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012). Atypical social cognition. In S.T. Fiske, & C.N. Macrae (Eds.), Sage Handbook of Social Cognition (pp. 411-428). Thousand Oaks, USA: Sage Publications.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011). Psychological models of autism: An overview. In I. Roth, & P. Rezaie (Eds.), Researching the Autism Spectrum: Contemporary Perspectives (pp. 219-265). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Periodicals

  • Heys, M., Alexander, A., Medeiros, E., Tumbahangphe, K.M., Gibbons, F., Shrestha, R., Manandhar, M., Wickenden, M., Shrestha, M., Costello, A., Manandhar, D., & Pellicano, E. (2017). Understanding parents’ and professionals’ knowledge and awareness of autism in Nepal. Autism, 21(4), 436-449. doi:10.1177/1362361316646558
  • Unigwe, S., Buckley, C., Crane, L., Kenny, L., Remington, A., & Pellicano, E. (2017). GPs' confidence in caring for their patients on the autism spectrum: An online self-report study. British Journal of General Practice, 67(659). doi:10.3399/bjgp17X690449
  • Bedford, R., Pellicano, E., Mareschal, D., & Nardini, M. (2016). Flexible integration of visual cues in adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Autism Research, 9(2), 272-281. doi:10.1002/aur.1509
  • Cage, E., Bird, G., & Pellicano, E. (2016). ‘I am who I am’: Reputation concerns in adolescents on the autism spectrum. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 25, 12-23. doi:10.1016/j.rasd.2016.01.010
  • Cage, E., Bird, G., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Reputation management in children on the autism spectrum. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(12), 3798-3811. doi:10.1007/s10803-016-2923-1
  • Edgington, L., Hill, V., & Pellicano, E. (2016). The design and implementation of a CBT-based intervention for sensory processing difficulties in adolescents on the autism spectrum. Resesarch in Developmental Disabilities, 59, 221-233. doi:10.1016/j.ridd.2016.09.004
  • Greathead, S., Yates, R., Hill, V., Kenny, L., Croydon, A., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Supporting children with severe-to-profound learning difficulties and complex communication needs to make their views known: Observation tools and methods. Topics in Language Disorders, 36(3), 217-244. doi:10.1097/TLD.0000000000000096
  • Hill, V., Croydon, A., Greathead, S., Kenny, L., Yates, R., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Research methods for children with multiple needs: Developing techniques to facilitate all children and young people to have 'a voice'. Educational & Child Psychology, 33(3), 26-43.
  • Karaminis, T., Cicchini, G.M., Neil, L., Cappagli, G., Aagten-Murphy, D., Burr, D., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Central tendency effects in time interval reproduction in autism. Scientific Reports, 6, 28570. doi:10.1038/srep28570
  • Kenny, L., Hattersley, C., Molins, B., Buckley, C., Povey, C., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Which terms should we use to describe autism? Perspectives from the UK autism community. Autism, 20(4), 442-462. doi:10.1177/1362361315588200
  • Manning, C., Kilner, J., Neil, L., Karaminis, T., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Children on the autism spectrum update their behaviour in response to a volatile environment. Developmental Science, 20(5). doi:10.1111/desc.12435
  • Maule, J., Stanworth, K., Pellicano, E., & Franklin, A. (2016). Color afterimages in autistic adults. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. doi:10.1007/s10803-016-2786-5
  • Maule, J., Stanworth, K., Pellicano, E., & Franklin, A. (2016). Ensemble perception of color in autistic adults. Autism Research. doi:10.1002/aur.1725
  • Neil, L., Cappagli, G., Karaminis, T., Jenkins, R., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Recognizing the same face in different contexts: Testing within-person face recognition in typical development and in autism. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 143, 139-153. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2015.09.029
  • Neil, L., Choque-Olsson, N., & Pellicano, E. (2016). The relationship between intolerance of uncertainty, sensory sensitivities, and anxiety in autistic and typically developing children. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(6), 1962-1973. doi:10.1007/s10803-016-2721-9
  • Sedgewick, F., Hill, V., Yates, R., Pickering, L., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Gender differences in the social motivation and friendship experiences of autistic and non-autistic adolescents. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(4), 1297-1306. doi:10.1007/s10803-015-2669-1
  • Smith, A.D., Kenny, L., Rudnicka, A., Briscoe, J., & Pellicano, E. (2016). Drawing firmer conclusions: Autistic children show no evidence of a local processing bias in a controlled copying task. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(11), 3481-3492. doi:10.1007/s10803-016-2889-z
  • Turi, M., Karaminis, T., Pellicano, E., & Burr, D. (2016). No rapid audiovisual recalibration in adults on the autism spectrum. Scientific Reports, 6, 21756. doi:10.1038/srep21756
  • Aagten-Murphy, D., Attucci, C., Daniel, N., Klaric, E., Burr, D., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Numerical estimation in children with autism. Autism Research, 8(6), 668-681. doi:10.1002/aur.1482
  • Gaudion, K., Hall, A., Myerson, J., & Pellicano, E. (2015). A designer’s approach: How can autistic adults with learning disabilities be involved in the design process? CoDesign, 11(1), 49-69. doi:10.1080/15710882.2014.997829
  • Karaminis, T., Turi, M., Neil, L., Badcock, N.A., Burr, D., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Atypicalities in perceptual adaptation in autism do not extend to perceptual causality. PLoS One, 10(3), e0120439. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0120439
  • Manning, C., Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Coherent motion processing in autism: Is dot lifetime an important parameter? Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(7), 2252-2258. doi:10.1007/s10803-015-2365-1
  • Manning, C., Dakin, S., Tibber, M., Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Enhanced integration of motion information in children with autism. Journal of Neuroscience, 35, 6979–6986. doi:10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4645-14.2015
  • McNerney, C., Hill, V., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Choosing a secondary school placement for students with an autism spectrum condition: A multi-informant study. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 19(10), 1096-1116. doi:10.1080/13603116.2015.1037869
  • Turi, M., Burr, D.C., Igliozzi, R., Aagten-Murphy, A., Muratori, F., & Pellicano, E. (2015). Children with autism spectrum disorder show reduced adaptation to number. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(25), 7868-7872. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1504099112
  • Croydon, A., Pimperton, H., Ewing, L., Duchaine, B., & Pellicano, E. (2014). The Cambridge Face Memory Test for Children (CFMT-C): A new tool for measuring face recognition skills in childhood. Neuropsychologia, 62, 60–67.
  • Manning, C., Dakin, S., Tibber, M., & Pellicano, E. (2014). A veraging, not internal noise, limits the development of coherent motion processing. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 10, 44-56.
  • Pellicano, E., Dinsmore, A., & Charman, T. (2014). What should autism research focus upon? Community views and priorities from the United Kingdom. Autism, 18(7), 756-770. doi://10.1177/1362361314529627
  • Pellicano, E., Dinsmore, A., & Charman, T. (2014). Views on researcher-community engagement in autism research in the United Kingdom: A mixed-methods study. PLoS ONE, 9(10), e109946. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0109946
  • Cage, E., Pellicano, E., Shah, P., & Bird, G. (2013). Reputation management: Evidence for ability but reduced propensity in autism. Autism Research, 6(5), 433-442.
  • Calder, L., Hill, V., & Pellicano, E. (2013). “Sometimes I want to play by myself”: Understanding what friendship means to children with autism in mainstream primary schools. Autism, 17, 296-316.
  • Ewing, L., Leach, K., Pellicano, E., Jeffery, L., & Rhodes, G. (2013). Reduced face aftereffects in autism are not due to poor attention. PLoS ONE, 8(11), e81353. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0081353
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2013). Reevaluating the selectivity of face-processing difficulties in children and adolescents with autism. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 115, 342-355.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2013). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism. Developmental Science, 16(1), 116-123. doi:10.1111/desc.12007
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2013). Using effort to measure reward value of faces in children with autism. PLoS ONE, 8(11), e79493. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0079493
  • Manning, C., Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2013). Processing slow and fast motion in autism spectrum conditions. Autism Research, 6(6), 531-541.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013). Sensory symptoms in autism: A blooming, buzzing confusion? Child Development Perspectives, 7(3), 143–148. doi:10.1111/cdep.12031
  • Pellicano, E. (2013). Testing the predictive power of cognitive atypicalities in autism: Evidence from a 3-year follow-up study. Autism Research, 6(4), 258-67. doi:10.1002/aur.1286
  • Pellicano, E. (2013). Editorial. Autism, 17(2), 131-132. doi:10.1177/1362361313479218
  • Pellicano, E., Rhodes, G., & Calder, A.J. (2013). Reduced gaze aftereffects are related to difficulties categorizing gaze direction in autism. Neuropsychologia, 51(8), 1504–1509. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.03.021
  • Fiorentini, C., Gray, L., Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2012). Reduced face identity aftereffects in relatives of children with autism. Neuropsychologia, 50, 2926-2932.
  • Manning, C., Aagten-Murphy , D., & Pellicano, E. (2012). The development of speed discrimination abilities. Vision Research, 70, 27-33.
  • Milton, D., Mills, R., & Pellicano, E. (2012). Ethics and autism: Where is the autistic voice? Commentary on Post et al. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 42, 12.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012). The development of executive function in autism. In "Autism: Cognitive Control across the Lifespan" [Special Issue]. Autism Research and Treatment, 2012, 146132. doi:10.1155/2012/146132
  • Pellicano, E. (2012). Do autistic symptoms persist across time? Evidence of substantial change in symptomatology over a 3-year period in cognitively able children with autism. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 117(2), 156-166.
  • Pellicano, E., & Burr, D. (2012). When the world becomes too real: A Bayesian explanation of autistic perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 16, 504-510.
  • Pellicano, E., & Burr, D. (2012). Noise and autism: Reply to Brock. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 16(12), 574-575.
  • Pellicano, E., & Burr, D. (2012). Noise and autism: Reply to Brock. Commentary. Trends in Cognitive Sciences,, 12, 574-575.
  • Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2011). Policy, proof and practice Public Service Review, 3, 48-49.
  • Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2011). Show me the evidence Special Educational Needs, 55, 76-77.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., & Taylor, E. (2011). Distinguishing norm-based from exemplar-based coding of identity in children: Evidence from face identity aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37(6), 1824-1840. doi: 10.1037/a0025643
  • Pellicano, E. (2011). The brain at school: Educational neuroscience in the classroom. Commentary. International Journal of Research & Method in Education, 34, 216-217.
  • Pellicano, E., & Stears, M. (2011). Bridging autism, science and society: Moving towards an ethically-informed approach to autism research. Autism Research, 4, 271-282.
  • Pellicano, E., Ne’eman, A., & Stears, M. (2011). Engaging, not excluding: A reply to Walsh et al. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 12, 769.
  • Pellicano, E., Ne’eman, A., & Stears, M. (2011). Engaging, not excluding: A reply to Walsh et al. Commentary Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 12, 769.
  • Pellicano, E., Smith, A. D., Cristino, F., Briscoe, J., Hood, B., & Gilchrist, I. D. (2011). Children with autism are neither systematic nor optimal foragers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 108, 421-426.
  • Pellicano, E., Smith, A. D., Cristino, F., Briscoe, J., Hood, B., & Gilchrist, I. D. (2011). Reply to Nemeth and Janacsek: Children with autism learn to search differently in a large-scale context. Commentary. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , 108(e58.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2010). Have you got the look? Gaze direction affects judgments of facial attractiveness. Visual Cognition, 18, 321-330.
  • Grinter, E., Maybery, M., Pellicano, E., Badcock, J. C., & Badcock, D. R. (2010). Perception of shapes targeting local and global processes in autism spectrum disorders Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, , 51, 717-724.
  • Jeffery, L., McKone, E., Haynes, R., Firth, E., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2010). Four-to-six year-old children use norm-based coding in face-space. Journal of Vision, 10(5, 18). doi:10.1167/10.5.18
  • Pellicano, E. (2010). The development of core cognitive skills in autism: a 3-year prospective study. Child Development, 81, 1400-1416.
  • Pellicano, E., Rhodes, G., & Calder, A. J (2010). Individual differences in executive function and central coherence predict developmental changes in theory of mind in autism Developmental Psychology, 46, 530-544.
  • Wallace, S., Sebastian, C., Pellicano, E., Parr, J., & Bailey, A (2010). Wallace, S., Sebastian, C., Pellicano, E., Parr, J., & Bailey, A Autism Research. , 3, 345-349.
  • Grinter, E., Maybery, M., van Beek, P., Pellicano, E., Badcock, J. C., & Badcock, D. R. (2009). Global visual processing and self-rated autistic-like traits Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, , 39, 1278-1290.
  • Pellicano, E. (2009). ‘Making sense of autism’. Review of Thompson, T. Commentary. Infant and Child Development,, 18, 372-374.
  • Pellicano, E., & Macrae, C. N. (2009). Mutual eye-gaze enhances gender categorization for typically developing children, but not for children with autism. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review,, 19, 1094-1099.
  • Pimperton, H., Jeffery, L., & Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2009). The role of high-level adaptive coding mechanisms in the development of face recognition Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, , 104, 229-238.
  • Nishimura, M., Maurer, D., Jeffery, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2008). Fitting the child’s mind to the world: Adaptive norm-based coding of facial identity in 8-year-olds. Developmental Science, 11, 620-627.
  • Pellicano, E. (2008). Autism: Face processing clues to inheritance. Commentary. Current Biology, 18, R748-750.
  • Pellicano, E., & Gibson, L. Y. (2008). Investigating the functional integrity of the dorsal visual pathway in autism and dyslexia: A research note Neuropsychologia, 46, 2593-2596.
  • Pellicano, E. (2007). Links between theory of mind and executive function in young children with autism: clues to developmental primacy Developmental Psychology, 43, 974-990.
  • Pellicano, E. (2007). Autism as a developmental disorder: tracking changes across time. The Psychologist, 20, 216-219.
  • Pellicano, E., Jeffery, L., Burr, D., & Rhodes, G (2007). Abnormal adaptive face-coding mechanisms in children with autism spectrum disorder Current Biology, 17, 1508-1512.
  • Pellicano, E., Maybery, M., Durkin, K., & Maley, A. (2006). Multiple cognitive capabilities/deficits in children with an autism spectrum disorder: ‘Weak’ central coherence and its relationship to theory of mind and executive control Development and Psychopathology,, 18, 77-98.
  • Pellicano, E., Rhodes, G., & Peters, M. (2006). Are preschoolers sensitive to configural information in faces? Developmental Science, 9, 270-277.
  • Pellicano, E. (2005). Mapping cognition onto the brain: ‘weak’ central coherence and global grouping. Commentry on Milne, Swettenham, & Campbel Current Psychology of Cognition, 23, 163-171.
  • Pellicano, E., Gibson, L., Maybery, M., Durkin, K., & Badcock, D. (2005). Abnormal cooperative processes along the dorsal visual pathway in autism: a possible mechanism for weak visuospatial coherence? Neuropsychologia,, 43, 1044-1053.
  • Pellicano, E., Maybery, M., & Durkin, K (2005). Central coherence in typically developing preschoolers: does it cohere and is it related to mindreading and executive control? Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 46, 533-547.
  • Zhou, G., Fu, X., Hayward, W. G., Locke, V., & Pellicano, E (2005). Diagnosticity principle and culture difference Journal of Culture and Cognition, 5, 240-247.
  • Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2003). The role of eye-gaze in understanding other minds. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 21, 33-43.
  • Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2003). Holistic processing of faces in preschool children and adults. Psychological Science, 14, 618-622.
  • Faulkner, T.F., Rhodes, G., Palermo, R., Pellicano, E., & Ferguson, D. (2002). Recognizing the un-real McCoy: Priming and the modularity of face recognition. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 9, 327-334.

Published Abstracts

  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K. & Taylor, E. (2010). Children's face coding is norm-based rather than exemplar-based: Evidence from face identity aftereffects [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7), 580.

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Bovis, M., Alexander, A., & Pellicano, E. (2016, December). "My brain helps me think about stuff": Autistic children's understanding of the brain and its role in behaviour. Poster session presented at the Australasian Society for Autism Research Conference, Perth.
  • Cribb, S., Kenny, L., & Pellicano, E. (2016, December). Understanding the transition to adulthood for young autistic people and their parents. Paper presented at the Australasian Society for Autism Research Conference, Perth.
  • Kenny, L., Cribb, S., & Pellicano, E. (2016, December). Childhood theory of mind planning and cognitive flexibility predict later behavioural outcomes in autistic adolescents. Paper presented at the Australasian Society for Autism Research Conference, Perth.
  • Sedgewick, F., Hil, V., & Pellicano, E. (2016, December). Gender differences in autistic and non-autistic adolescents' peer conflict. Poster session presented at the Australasian Society for Autism Research Conference, Perth.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, October). Making decisions, transforming lives: Building a participatory framework. Invited paper presented at the Phoenix School Annual Conference, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, October). The primary-to-secondary school transition for children on the autism spectrum. Invited paper presented at the Educated Brain at School: Late Childhood and Adolescence Conference, University of Cambridge, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, September). Towards a new science of autism: Building a participatory framework. Invited paper presented at the XI Autism-Europe International Congress, Edinburgh, Scotland.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, July). Towards a new science of autism: Building a participatory framework. Invited paper presented at the 12th Annual Pediatrics Bioethics Conference, Seattle Children's Hospital, USA.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., King, H., Farran, E.K., Karmiloff-Smith, A., & Smith, M.L. (2016, June). Atypical information-use in children with autism spectrum disorder during judgements of child and adult face identity. Poster session presented at the Neurodevelopmental Disorders Annual Seminar, University College London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, April). Autism, neurodiversity and participation. Keynote presentation given at the Staff Disability Forum, University College London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, April). Transforming autism research and practice: Building a participatory framework. Keynote paper presented at the Focus on Autism Conference, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
  • Pellicano, E. (2016, March). Building a participatory framework for autism research: The what, the why and the how. Paper presented at the DCLinPsy Conference, University College London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2015, October). Having my say: Autism in education. Presentation given at the Autism West Talk Series, Perth.
  • Pellicano, E. (2015, September). Doing autism research well: Building a participatory framework. Keynote paper presented at the Asia Pacific Autism Conference (APAC), Brisbane.
  • Pellicano, E. (2015, September). Having my say: Getting young autistic people and their families involved in educational decision making. Paper presented at the 2015 Asia Pacific Autism Conference (APAC), Brisbane.
  • Pellicano, E. (2015, January). Eliciting the views and perspectives of children with autism living in residential schools. Keynote paper presented at the 5th Meeting of Minds conference, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, October). A future made together: New directions in the ethics of autism research. Presentation given at the Public lecture for the Institute of Advanced Studies, University of Western Australia.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, September). Early cognitive biomarkers predicting longitudinal course in ASD. Invited paper presented at the International Scientific Symposium on “Biomarkers and biologically guided therapeutic options of child psychiatric disorders”, Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, August). Teen autism. Presentation given at the A2ndVoice Autism Support Group Meeting, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, July). Autism in England: Building on the existing strategy. Invited paper presented at the Westminster Health Forum Keynote Seminar: Improving autism care and delivering the revised national strategy, London, England.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, July). When the world becomes too real: a new account of autistic perception. Invited paper presented at the 4th IMPRS NeuroCom Summer School, University College London.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, July). Defining outcomes for autistic people: what are “we” striving for? Keynote paper presented at the Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) Autism Special Interest Group (SIG) Conference, London, England.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, June). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited paper presented at the Postgraduate Certificate in Autism conference, University of Roehampton, Roehampton.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, June). What do people want from autism research? Presentation given at the Merton Mencap’s Talk Autism!, Merton, Surrey, England.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, May). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited paper presented at the A. J. Drexel Autism Institute, Drexel University, Philadelphia.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, April). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited paper presented at the Autism Diagnosis: Making Voices Heard Conference, Goldsmith, University of London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E., Heys, M., & Costello, A. (2014, April). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the A Future Made Together: Shaping Autism Research in Wales, Wales Autism Research Centre, Cardiff, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, March). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Presentation given at the Theorising Autism Workshop, The Centre for Research in Autism and Education, Institute of Education, University of London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, March). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Colloquium at the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour Seminar, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, January). Defining outcomes for autistic people: What are “we” striving for? Invited presentation given at the Senior Leadership Team, Oak Lodge School, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2014, January). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the Autism Education Trust’s External Reference Group, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, December). Defining outcomes for autistic people: What are “we” striving for? Invited presentation given at the EU-funded COMENIUS Project, Netley Primary School, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited presentation given at the Developmental Psychopathology Seminar Series, School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). A future made together: New directions for autism research in the UK. Invited presentation given at the Action on Autism Research in Scotland – Improving Impact Seminar Series, Glasgow, Scotland, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited presentation given at the Cognition and Language in Developmental Disorders Workshop as part of the LanPercept Initial Training Network, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). Defining good outcomes for autistic people: what are "we" striving for? Symposium conducted at the Outreach Symposium for the LanPercept Intitial Training Network, University of Seville, Seville, Spain.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the National Autism Research Meeting, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, November). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the Southampton Education School, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, October). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the Preconference Workshop of the Cognitive Development Society, titled “Rethinking Cognitive Development & Autism”, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, October). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited presentation given at the Communication and Autism Team (CAT), Birmingham, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, October). New directions in the ethics of autism research. Invited paper presented at the Ambitious about Autism’s Staff Conference, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, September). New directions for autism research. Keynote paper presented at the SAGE Publishing Company Meeting, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, April). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited colloquium at the School of Public Health, and the Office of International Programs, Drexel University, Philadelphia, USA.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, April). When the world becomes too real: A Bayesian explanation of autistic perception. Invited paper presented at the Workshop on Predictions, Bodies and Ecologies: New Directions for the Cognitive Sciences?, Aarhus, Denmark.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, April). Understanding the friendship experiences of young people with autism Invited paper presented at the Autism@Aarhus Spring Workshop: Friendship and Autism, Aarhus, Denmark.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, March). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited colloquium at the Institute of Neuroscience, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, January). Doing autism research well: Building a participatory framework. Invited paper presented at the Meeting of Minds 4 Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • Pellicano, E. (2013, January). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, University of Kent, Kent, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, December). Defining good outcomes for autistic people: what are “we” striving for? Paper presented at the Social Sciences Research Unit, Institute of Education, London.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, December). When the world becomes too real: a new explanation of autistic perception. Invited paper presented at the Australian Society for Autism Research , Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, December). Defining good outcomes for autistic people: what are “we” striving for? Invited presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, December). When the world becomes too real: a new explanation of autistic perception. Invited presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, December). When the world becomes too real: a new explanation of autistic perception. Invited paper presented at the School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Melbourne.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, November). Defining good outcomes for autistic people: what are “we” striving for? Invited paper presented at the University of Western Australia, Perth.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, October). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited presentation given at the Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, October). When the world becomes too real: A new explanation of autistic perception. Invited presentation given at the Department of Psychology, Glasgow University, Glasgow, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, October). When the world becomes too real: a new explanation of autistic perception. Invited paper presented at the Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde,.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2012, September). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in autism. Paper presented at the Australian Psychological Society National Conference, Perth.
  • Fiorentini, C., Gray, L., Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2012, September). Reduced face identity aftereffects in relatives of children with autism. Poster session presented at the 35th European Conference of Visual Perception (ECVP), Alghero, Italy.
  • Pellicano, E., Aagten-Murphy , D., Daniel, N., & Burr, D. (2012, September). Number sense in autism. Paper presented at the 35th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP), Alghero, Italy.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, July). Autism: Bridging research and practice. Invited presentation given at the Pan London SEN LA Officers’ Professional Network, Institute of Education, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, July). Redefining autism: Changing the diagnostic criteria. Keynote paper presented at the Haringey Children’s Services’ Conference on Including Children and Young People with Autism, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E., Aagten-Murphy , D., Daniel, N., & Burr, D. (2012, July). Number sense in autism. Paper presented at the Experimental Psychology Society Meeting, Bristol, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, June). Sensory issues in autism. What does new research tell us? Invited paper presented at the Autism Oxford Conference on Sensory Issues & the Autism Spectrum: Research & Reality, Oxford, UK.
  • Calder, L., Hill, V., & Pellicano, E. (2012, May). Friendship networks and social inclusion in young people with autism. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), Toronto, Canada.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2012, May). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), Toronto, Canada.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2012, May). Perceiving faces: Atypical representations in children with autism. Presentation given at the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2012, May). Perceiving faces: Atypical representations in children with autism. Presentation given at the Department of Psychology, Brock University, St Catharines, Canada.
  • Manning, C., Aagten-Murphy , D., Charman, T., & Pellicano, E. (2012, May). Speed discrimination abilities in typical development and in children with autism. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), Toronto, Canada.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, May). Number sense in autism. Invited presentation given at the Developmental Neurocognition Lab, Birkbeck College, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, May). What does research tell us about the sensory sensitivities in autism? Keynote symposium conducted at the Oxford Family Services Professional Training Day on Sensory Processing and Autism, Oxford, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, May). Hopes and aspirations for people with autism: What are “we” striving for? Presentation given at the Special Interest Group on “Autism Social, Ethical and Legal Research" at the 12th Annual Meeting of the International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), Toronto, Canada.
  • Pellicano, E., Aagten-Murphy , D., Daniel, N., Klaric, E., & Burr, D. (2012, May). Number sense in autism. Poster session presented at the ‘Neuroscience and Education’ Meeting of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI), Institute of Education, London, UK.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2012, April). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in children with autism. Paper presented at the 39th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Sydney.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2012, April). Atypical updating of face representations with experience in autism. Poster session presented at the 39th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Sydney.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, April). What counts as a good outcome for autistic people? Invited paper presented at the “Autism, Ethics and the Good Life” conference sponsored by the British Academy, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, March). Bridging autism, science and society: Considering the real-world implications of the new sciences of autism. Invited colloquium at the Cerebra Centre for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, March). Bridging autism, science and society: Moving toward an ethically informed approach to autism research. Invited colloquium at the Centre for Educational Neuroscience’s Seminar Series, Institute of Education, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, March). Autism spectrum conditions: What we know so far. Invited presentation given at the Putting Research into Practice: “Developmental Disorders” Workshop at London South Bank University, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2012, January). Sensory issues in autism. What does new research tell us? Invited paper presented at the Autism Oxford Conference on Sensory Issues & the Autism Spectrum: Research & Reality, Milton Keynes, UK.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2011, November). Can atypical face rewards explain face processing impairments in autism? Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., Taylor, E., & Read, A. (2011, November). Insights into the development of face recognition mechanisms as revealed by face aftereffects. Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, November). Community participation in autism research. Invited presentation given at the Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN) Symposium on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Autism Research, Harvard Business School, Cambridge, USA.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, November). Autistic rights and autism research: Building a participatory framework. Invited presentation given at the London Autism Rights Movement (LARM) Annual General Meeting, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, November). Testing cognitive theories of autism: Lessons from large-scale search. Invited paper presented at the Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) Autism Special Interest Group (SIG) Conference, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, November). The development of core cognitive functions in children with autism spectrum conditions. Invited presentation given at the One-day research-practice conference “Even-waardig: Autisme, theorie, and praktijk”, Doorwerth, The Netherlands.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, October). Bridging autism, science and society in the UK. Invited presentation given at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Intragency Coordinating Committee (IACC) workshop on the Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Autism Research, Bethesda, USA.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, September). The development of core cognitive functions in children with autism spectrum conditions. Invited presentation given at the Distance Education course on Autism, School of Education, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, July). Testing cognitive theories of autism: Lessons from large-scale search. Invited presentation given at the Educational Psychology (Autism Special Interest Group) Conference, Institute of Education, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, June). Perceptual adaptation in autism. Invited presentation given at the Workshop on ‘Autism: Animal and Human Developments’, Istituto di Neuroscienze CNR, Pisa, Italy.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, June). The role of attention in the development of executive function. Invited presentation given at the Workshop on ‘Attention in Autism’, City University, London, UK.
  • Bedford, R., Nardini, M., Pellicano, E., Begus, K., & Mareschal, D. (2011, May). Integration of visual cues in adolescents with an autism spectrum disorder Poster session presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2011, May). Can atypical face rewards explain face processing impairments in autism? Paper presented at the Person Perception Seminar Series, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Australia.
  • Koldewyn, K., Jiang, Y. V., Weiglet, S., Pellicano, E., & Kanwisher, N. (2011, May). Attention and executive function in children with ASD. Invited poster session presented at the 10th International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), San Diego, USA.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, May). Children with autism search differently in a large-scale context. Invited presentation given at the Seminar for the Wales Autism Research Centre, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, May). Understanding the cognitive profile of autism: how we might use this knowledge to inform real life skills in autism. Invited presentation given at the 1st Baston House School Conference, Bromley, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, May). Children with autism search differently in a large-scale context Invited presentation given at the Seminar for Guy’s and St Thomas’s Child Development team, Evelina Children’s Hospital, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, May). Disrupted perceptual adaptation in autism: A working hypothesis. Invited presentation given at the Seminar for the Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E., Aagten-Murphy , D., Attucci, C., Klaric, E., & Burr, D. (2011, May). Number sense in autism. Poster session presented at the 10th International Meeting for Autism Research (IMFAR), San Diego, USA.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2011, April). Face processing impairments in autism spectrum conditions cannot be explained by atypical reward value of faces. Paper presented at the 38th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Auckland, New Zealand.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, April). Children with autism search differently in a large-scale context. Invited presentation given at the Seminar for the Department of Child Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, London, UK.
  • Pellicano, E. (2011, February). Executive function in autism. Invited paper presented at the Meeting entitled, “Attention deficits in autism” organised by Prof. Nancy Kanwisher and Prof. Yuhong Jiang on behalf of the Simons Foundation, New York, USA.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2010, May). Specificity of Face Processing Impairments in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Presentation given at the Face Processing Research Interest Group, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, UK.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., & Taylor, L. (2010, May). Children' face coding is norm-based rather than exemplar-based: Evidence from face identity aftereffects. Poster session presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, USA.
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2010, April). Specificity of face processing impairments in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Paper presented at the SEPEX/EPS combined meeting, Granada, Spain .
  • Ewing, L., Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2010, April). Specificity of face processing impairments in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Paper presented at the Newcastle University, Newcastle.
  • Pellicano, E., & Rhodes, G. (2010, April). Eye-gaze aftereffects in autism: Further evidence of weakened adaptive mechanisms. Invited paper presented at the SEPEX/EPS combined meeting, Granada, Spain.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2009, April). Adaptive norm-based coding of facial identity in children: The face identity aftereffect is selective for opposite identities. Paper presented at the Experimental Psychology Society meeting,, Wollongong.
  • Ewing, L., Rhodes, G., & Pellicano, E. (2008, March). Have you “got the look”? Gaze direction affects facial attractiveness. Paper presented at the Experimental Psychology Society , Perth.
  • Rhodes, G., Pellicano, E., Jaquet, E., & Jeffery, L. (2008, March). Adaptive processes in normal and disordered face recognition. Paper presented at the 7th Tsukuba International Conference on Memory, Tsukuba, Japan.
  • Rhodes, G., Pellicano, E., Jeffery, L., & Burr, D. (2008, March). Adaptive processes in normal and disordered face perception Paper presented at the Experimental Psychology Society , Perth, Australia.
  • Pellicano, E., Jeffery, L., & Rhodes, G. (2007, January). Face perception in autism: is identity coded relative to a norm? Paper presented at the Experimental Psychology Society, University College London, UK.

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Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
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