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Dr Kate Crookes

BA/BSc Melb, BSc ANU, PhD ANU.

Kate Crookes

Associate Investigator

Contact Details

Phone : +61 8 64883240
email : kate.crookes@uwa.edu.au
ORCID : http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6887-6197

External Address

School of Psychological Science
The University of Western Australia

Profile

I am interested in how experience affects face recognition. In my Phd I investigated the development of face and object identity recognition in infants and children. In my current post doc position I am investigating perceptual expertise and social categorisation contributions to race effects in face recognition using behavioural and eye-tracking methods.

Awards

  • Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference Travel Award (2008), Crookes, K.
  • ANU Vice-Chancellor's Travel Grant (2008), Crookes, K.
  • Australian Postgraduate Award (2008), Crookes, K.
  • ANU Vice-Chancellor's Travel Grant (2007), Crookes, K.
  • Australian Postgraduate Award (2005), Crookes, K.
  • ANU Honours Psychology Thesis Prize (2004), Crookes, K.
  • ANU Honours Scholarship (2004), Crookes, K.

Media Engagement

Selected Publications

Book Chapters

  • McKone, E., Crookes, K. & Kanwisher, N. (2009). The cognitive and neural development of face recognition in humans. In M.S. Gazzaniga (Ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences (4th ed., pp. 467-482). Cambridge Massachusetts, USA: Bradford Books.

Periodicals

  • Chuk, T., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J.H. (2017). Hidden Markov model analysis reveals the advantage of analytic eye movement patterns in face recognition across cultures. Cognition, 169, 102-117. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2017.08.003
  • Collova, J.R., Kloth, N., Crookes, K., Burton, N., Chan, C.Y., Hsiao, J.H., & Rhodes, G. (2017). A new other-race effect for gaze perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 43(11), 1857-1863. doi:10.1037/xhp0000460
  • Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (In Press). Poor recognition of other-race faces cannot always be explained by a lack of effort. Visual Cognition.
  • McKone, E., Wan, L., Robbins, R., Crookes, K., & Liu, J. (In Press). Diagnosing prosopagnosia in East Asian individuals: Norms for the Cambridge Face Memory Test-Chinese. Cognitive Neuropsychology. doi:10.1080/02643294.2017.1371682
  • Wan, L., Crookes, K., Dawel, A., Pidcock, M., Hall, A., & McKone, E. (2017). Face-blind for other-race faces: Individual differences in other-race recognition impairments. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 146(1), 102-122. doi:10.1037/xge0000249
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., Chu, M.H., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2016). Holistic processing of face configurations and components. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 42(10), 1482-1489. doi:10.1037/xhp0000246
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W.G., Oxner, M., Pond, S., & Rhodes, G. (2015). How well do computer-generated faces tap face expertise? PLoS One, 10(11), e0141353. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0141353
  • Wan, L., Crookes, K., Reynolds, K., Irons, J., & McKone, E. (2015). A cultural setting where the other-race effect on face recognition has no social-motivational component and derives entirely from lifetime perceptual experience. Cognition, 144, 91-115. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2015.07.011
  • Crookes, K., & Robbins, R.A. (2014). No childhood development of viewpoint-invariant face recognition: Evidence from 8-year-olds and adults. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 126, 103–111. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2014.03.010
  • Crookes, K., Favelle, S., & Hayward, W.G. (2013). Holistic processing for other-race faces in Chinese participants occurs for upright but not inverted faces. Frontiers in Psychology, 4, 29.
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2013). The other-race effect: Holistic coding differences and beyond. Visual Cognition, 21(9-10), 1224-1247. doi:10.1080/13506285.2013.824530
  • McKone, E., Davies, A.A., Darke, H., Crookes, K., Wickramariyaratne, T., Zappa, S., Fiorentini, C., Favelle, S., Broughton, M., & Fernando, D. (2013). Importance of the inverted control in measuring holistic face processing with the composite effect and part-whole effect. Frontiers in Psychology, 4, 33.
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2012). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts sensitivity to vertical over horizontal changes in eye position. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 38(6), 1428. doi:10.1037/a0027943
  • McKone, E., Crookes, K., Jeffery, L., & Dilks, D.D. (2012). A critical review of the development of face recognition: Experience is less important than previously believed. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 29, 174-212.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., & Taylor, E. (2011). Distinguishing norm-based from exemplar-based coding of identity in children: Evidence from face identity aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37(6), 1824-1840. doi: 10.1037/a0025643
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2009). Early maturity of face recognition: No childhood development of holistic processing, novel face encoding, or face-space. Cognition, 111(2), 219-247.
  • Susilo, T., Crookes, K., McKone, E., & Turner, H. (2009). The composite task reveals an own-age bias on holistic face processing in children. PLoS One, 4(7), e6460.
  • McKone, E. & Crookes, K. (2007). Understanding the developmental origins of primate face recognition: Theoretical commentary on Martin-Malivel and Okada. Behavioral Neuroscience, 121(6), 1437-1441.

Published Abstracts

  • Chuk, T., Luo, A.X., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J. (2014). Caucasian and Asian eye movement patterns in face recognition: A computational exploration using hidden Markov models [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 14(10), 1212. doi:10.1167/14.10.1212
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S., & Rhodes, G. (2014). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 14(10), 819. doi:10.1167/14.10.819
  • Hayward, W.G., Lao, J., Cheng, Z., Crookes, K., Liu, T.T., & Caldara, R. (2013). Eye movements for scrambled faces [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 13(9), 398.
  • Wan, L., McKone, E., Irons, J., & Crookes, K. (2013). Reducing the other-race effect requires childhood visual experience, not increased social motivation [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 13(9), 862.
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2012). Race differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 12(9), 988. doi:10.1167/12.9.988
  • Crookes, K., & Hayward, W.G. (2011). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal, not long-range versus short-range, spatial relations [Abstract]. iPerception, 2(4), 237.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W. G., & Favelle, S. (2011). No own-­?race advantage for holistic face processing in Chinese participants [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 11(11), 624.
  • Hayward, W. G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S., & Rhodes, G. (2011). Why are face composites difficult to recognize? [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 11(11), 668.
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2010). The innate 'face' representation is more broadly tuned: 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7), 495.
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2010). Individual-level discrimination – An innate capacity? 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses [Abstract]. Vision, 22(Suppl. 7).
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K. & Taylor, E. (2010). Children's face coding is norm-based rather than exemplar-based: Evidence from face identity aftereffects [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 10(7), 580.
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2008). Childhood improvements in face performance result from general cognitive development not changes in face perception: Evidence from faces versus objects, inversion and implicit memory [Abstract]. Journal of Vision, 8(6), 192.
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2008). Perceptual narrowing during development: How broad is the innate representation driving adult face-specificity? [Abstract]. Australian Journal of Psychology, 66(Suppl. 60).
  • Crookes, K., & McKone, E. (2005). Childhood development of implicit memory for unfamiliar faces [Abstract]. Australian Journal of Psychology, 50(Suppl. 57).

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Collova, J., Kloth, N., Crookes, K., Burton, N., & Rhodes, G. (2016, August). Is there an own-race advantage for perception of gaze direction? Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Annual Workshop, The Fairmont Resort, Leura.
  • Crookes, K. (2016, August). Childhood development of face recognition: Recent evidence suggests early maturity of face-specific processing. Invited colloquium at the School of Psychology and Exercise Science, Murdoch University, Perth.
  • Thorup, B., Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2016, August). An own-race advantage for categorising faces by national origin. Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Annual Workshop, The Fairmont Resort, Leura.
  • Collova, J., Kloth, N., Crookes, K., Rhodes, G., & Burton, N. (2016, July). Is there an other-race effect for detection of gaze direction? Poster session presented at the 12th Annual Asia Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2016), Fremantle.
  • Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2016, July). Poor recognition of other-race faces cannot be explained by lack of motivation. Paper presented at the 12th Annual Asia Pacific Conference on Vision (APCV 2016), Fremantle.
  • Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2016, April). Poor recognition of other-race faces cannot be explained by a lack of motivation. Paper presented at the 43rd Annual Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Melbourne.
  • Wan, L., Crookes, K. & McKone, E. (2015, April). Can other-race face perception be so poor it qualifies as “prosopagnosia”? Poster session presented at the 42nd Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference, Sydney.
  • Collova, J.R., Kloth, N., Crookes, K., & Rhodes, G. (2015, March). The eyes have it! An own-race advantage for gaze direction perception. Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders International Person Perception Workshop, Perth.
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S. & Rhodes, G. (2015, March). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise. Poster session presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders International Person Perception Workshop, Perth.
  • Chuk, T., Luo, A.X., Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Chan, A.B., & Hsiao, J. (2014, May). Caucasian and Asian eye movement patterns in face recognition: A computational exploration using hidden Markov models. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), St Pete Beach, USA.
  • Crookes, K., Ewing, L., Gildenhuys, J., Kloth, N., Hayward, W., Oxner, M., Pond, S. & Rhodes, G. (2014, May). Computer generated faces may not tap face expertise. Poster session presented at the 14th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), St Pete Beach, USA.
  • Wan, L., McKone, E., Crookes, K., Reynolds, K., & Irons, J. (2014, April). The other-race effect in face memory cannot be overcome by motivation, but early-life inter-racial contact can help. Poster session presented at the 41st Annual Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Brisbane.
  • Crookes, K. (2013, November). Can the other-race effect in face recognition be overcome? Paper presented at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Crookes, K., & Robbins, R. (2013, August). No evidence for childhood development in viewpoint invariant face encoding. Poster session presented at the 36th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP), Bremen, Germany.
  • Cheng, Z., Lao, J., Crookes, K., Liu, T.T., Caldara, R. & Hayward W.G. (2013, July). Eye movements for intact and scrambled faces. Paper presented at the 9th Asia Pacific Conference on Vision, Suzhou, China.
  • Crookes, K. (2013, May). Childhood development of face recognition: Recent evidence suggests early maturity face-specific processing. Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Hayward, W.G., Lao, J., Cheng, Z., Crookes, K., Liu, T.T., & Caldara, R. (2013, May). Eye movements for scrambled faces. Poster session presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Wan, L., McKone, E., Irons, J., & Crookes, K. (2013, May). Reducing the other-race effect requires childhood visual experience, not increased social motivation. Poster session presented at the 13th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Crookes, K., Lao, J., Caldara, R., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2013, April). On the nose: Cultural differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces. Paper presented at the 40th Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Adelaide.
  • Crookes, K., Lao, J., Caldara, R., Rhodes, G., & Hayward, W.G. (2013, April). On the nose: Cultural differences in eye movements to three-quarter view faces. Colloquium at the School of Psychology, The University of Western Australia, Perth.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W.G., Lao, J. & Caldara, R. (2012, May). Race differences in eye-movements to three-quarter view faces. Poster session presented at the 12th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., Taylor, E., & Read, A. (2011, November). Insights into the development of face recognition mechanisms as revealed by face aftereffects. Presentation given at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders (CCD) Annual Workshop, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Crookes, K. (2011, September). Holistic and configural face processing in Chinese participants. Presentation given at the International Symposium on "Neural, perceptual and cognitive mechanisms involved in recognising other-race and other-age faces". Person Perception Seminar Series, University of Western Australia.
  • Crookes, K. & Hayward, W. G. (2011, July). Face inversion disproportionately disrupts detection of vertical versus horizontal not long-range versus short-range spatial relations. Poster session presented at the 7th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Hong Kong.
  • Hayward, W.G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2011, July). Does the own-race advantage in face processing have a basis in holistic processing? Paper presented at the 5th International Conference on Memory (ICOM5), York, UK.
  • Crookes, K., Hayward, W. G., & Favelle, S. (2011, May). No own-race advantage for holistic face processing in Chinese participants. Poster session presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, USA.
  • Hayward, W. G., Crookes, K., Favelle, S.K., & Rhodes, G. (2011, May). Why are face composites difficult to recognize? Poster session presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), Naples, USA.
  • Crookes, K. (2010, December). Holistic processing in Asia: Exploring the part-whole effect in Chinese participants. Presentation given at the Cognition and Perception Laboratories, Australian National University.
  • Crookes, K. & Hayward, W. G. (2010, July). Holistic processing in Asia: Exploring the part-whole effect in Chinese participants. Paper presented at the Hong Kong University International Workshop on Visual Cognition, Hong Kong.
  • Crookes, K. & McKone, E. (2010, July). Individual-level discrimination - An innate capacity? 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses. Paper presented at the 6th Asia-Pacific Conference on Vision, Taipei, Taiwan.
  • Crookes, K. (2010, June). The innate “face” representation is more broadly tuned: 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses Colloquium at the Perception, Attention and Learning Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Crookes, K. & McKone, E. (2010, June). The innate 'face' representation is more broadly tuned: 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference, Hong Kong.
  • Crookes, K. & McKone, E. (2010, May). The innate "face" representation is more broadly tuned: 4-month-old infants individuate upright but not inverted horses. Paper presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, USA.
  • Jeffery, L., Rhodes, G., McKone, E., Pellicano, E., Crookes, K., & Taylor, L. (2010, May). Children' face coding is norm-based rather than exemplar-based: Evidence from face identity aftereffects. Poster session presented at the 10th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Naples, USA.

Further Information

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Telephone: +61 2 9850 4127
Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
Web : www.ccd.edu.au

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