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Dr Nenagh Kemp

BA UTAS, DPhil Oxon.

Associate Investigator

Contact Details

Phone : +61 3 6226 7534
email : nenagh.kemp@utas.edu.au
ORCID : http://orcid.org/0000-0002-8214-5427

External Address

School of Psychology
University of Tasmania

Profile

I’m a senior lecturer in Psychology at the University of Tasmania. My DPhil at the University of Oxford was on children’s spelling, and I completed a post-doc at the Max Planck Child Study Centre at the University of Manchester on early language acquisition, and a post-doc at the Infant Studies Centre at the University of British Columbia on the early detection of language delay.

My current research interests include 1) spelling development in children and spelling strategies in adults, 2) the way that written language is changing in the context of digital communication (u no wot i mean?!) and links between the use of this new writing style and conventional literacy skills in both children and adults, and 3) the nature and social function of diminutives, or hypocoristics, in Australian English, such as footy, barbie, arvo, mobes.

Recent External Appointments

  • Associate Editor, Reading and Writing. (2013 continuing)
  • Associate Editor, Journal of Research in Reading. (2011 continuing)
  • Editorial Board Member, Scientific Studies of Reading. (2010 continuing)

Awards

  • Office for Learning and Teaching, Citation for Outstanding Contribution to Student Learning (2015), Kemp, N.
  • Vice Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Contribution to Teaching and Learning (UTAS) (2012), Kemp, N.
  • Teaching Merit Certificate (2011), Kemp, N.
  • Teaching Merit Certificate (2009), Kemp, N.
  • Teaching Merit Certificate (2007), Kemp, N.

Recent Grants Awarded

  • Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE) National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources (NeCTAR) Project Virtual Laboratory Program Grant (2012 - 2013) "Above and beyond speech, language, and music: A virtual lab for human communication science." Burnham, D. et al., including Kemp, N. ($1,408,829)
  • Australian Geographic Seed Grant (2011 - 2012) "Our Aussie Lingo: How and why we use Australian diminutives". Kemp, N., & Kidd, E. ($1,771)
  • ARC Linkage Infrastructure and Facilities Grant [LE100100211] (2010 - 2013) “The big Australian speech corpus: An audio-visual speech corpus of Australian English.” Burnham, D.K., Cox, F.M., Butcher, A.R., Fletcher, J.M., Wagner, M., Epps, J.R., Ingram, J.C., Arciuli, J., Togneri, R., Rose, P.J., Kemp, N.M., Cutler, A., Dale, R., Kuratate, T., Powers, D.M., Cassidy, S., Grayden, D.B., Loakes, D.E., et al ($650,000)
  • Nuffield Foundation Grant (2010 - 2012) "Text messaging and grammatical development". Wood, C., & Kemp, N. ($250,835)

Media Engagement

Selected Publications

Books

  • Wood, C., Kemp, N., & Plester, B. (2014). Text-messaging and literacy: The evidence. Oxford: Routledge.

Book Chapters

  • Kemp, N. (2016). Children's first language acquisition of the English writing system. In V. Cook & D. Ryan (Eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the English Writing System (pp. 191-206). London, UK: Routledge.
  • Waldron, S., Kemp, N., & Wood, C. (2016). Texting and language learning. In A. Georgakopoulou & T. Spilioti (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Language and Digital Communication (pp. 180-193). Oxford, UK: Routledge.
  • Grace, A., & Kemp, N. (2015). Assessing the written language of text messages. In L.D. Rosen, N.A. Cheever, & L.M. Carrier (Eds.), The Wiley Handbook of Psychology, Technology, and Society (pp. 207-231). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Waldron, S., Kemp, N., Plester, B., & Wood, C. (2015). Texting behavior and language skills in children and adults. In L.D. Rosen, N.A. Cheever, & L.M. Carrier (Eds.), The Wiley Handbook of Psychology, Technology, and Society (pp. 232-249). Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Kemp, N. (2013). Language use and assessment. In A. Holliman (Ed.), Routledge International Companion to Educational Psychology. Oxford: Routledge.
  • Kemp, N. (2009). The acquisition of spelling patterns: Early, late, or never? In C. Wood & V. Connolly (Eds.), Contemporary perspectives on reading and spelling (pp. 76-91). Oxford: Routledge.

Periodicals

  • Grieve, R., Kemp, N., Norris, K., & Padgett, C.R. (2017). Push or pull? Unpacking the social compensation hypothesis of Internet use in an educational context. Computers & Education, 109, 1-10. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2017.02.008
  • Kemp, N., & Grace, A. (2017). Txting across time: Undergraduates' use of 'textese' in seven consecutive first-year psychology cohorts. Writing Systems Research, 9(1), 82-98. doi:10.1080/17586801.2017.1285220
  • Kemp, N., Mitchell, P., & Bryant, P. (2017). Simple morphological spelling rules are not always used: Individual differences in children and adults. Applied Psycholinguistics, 38(5), 1071-1094. doi:10.1017/S0142716417000042
  • Kemp, N., Scott, J., Bernhardt, B.M., Johnson, C.E., Siegel, L.S., & Werker, J.F. (2017). Minimal pair word learning and vocabulary size: Link with later language skills. Applied Psycholinguistics, 38(2), 289-314. doi:10.1017/S0142716416000199
  • O'Meagher, S., Kemp, N., Anderson, P., & Skilbeck, C. (2017). Risk factors for executive function difficulties in preschool and early school-age preterm children. Acta Paediatrica, 106(9), 1468-1473. doi:10.1111/apa.13915
  • Howes, L.M., & Kemp, N. (2016). Discord in the communication of forensic science: Can the science of language help foster shared understanding? Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 36(1), 96-111. doi:10.1177/0261927X16663589
  • Kemp, N., & Clayton J. (In Press). University students vary their use of textese in digital messages to suit the recipient. Journal of Research in Reading. doi:10.1111/1467-9817.12074
  • Kidd, E., Kemp, N., Kashima, E.S., & Quinn, S. (2016). Language, culture, and group membership: An investigation into the social effects of colloquial Australian English. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 47(5), 713-733. doi:10.1177/0022022116638175
  • Waldron, S., Wood, C., & Kemp, N. (2016). Use of predictive text in text messaging over the course of a year and its relationship with spelling, orthographic processing and grammar. Journal of Research in Reading, 40(4), 384-402. doi:10.1111/1467-9817.12073
  • Grace, A., & Kemp, N. (2015). Text messaging language: A comparison of undergraduates’ naturalistic textism use in four consecutive cohorts. Writing Systems Research, 7(2), 220-234. doi:10.1080/17586801.2014.898575
  • Grieve, R., & Kemp, N. (2015). Individual differences predicting social connectedness derived from Facebook: Some unexpected findings. Computers in Human Behavior, 51, 239-243. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2015.04.034
  • Kemp, N., Treiman, R., Blackley, H., Svoboda, I., & Kessler, B. (2015). Lexical classification and spelling: Do people use atypical spellings for atypical pseudowords? Reading and Writing, 28(8), 1187-1202. doi:0.1007/s11145-015-9567-y
  • Grace, A., Kemp, N., Martin, F.H., & Parrila, R. (2014). Undergraduates’ text messaging language and literacy skills. Reading and Writing, 27, 855-873. doi:10.1007/s11145-013-9471-2
  • Howes, L., Kirkbride, K.P., Kelty, S.F., Julian, R., & Kemp, N. (2014). The readability of expert reports for non-scientist report-users: Reports of forensic comparisons of glass. Forensic Science International, 236, 54-66. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2013.12.031
  • Howes, L., Kirkbride, P., Kelty, S., Julian, R., & Kemp, N. (2014). The readability of expert reports for non-scientist report-users: Reports of DNA analysis. Forensic Science International, 237, 7-18. doi: 10.1016/j.forsciint.2014.01.007
  • Kemp, N., & Grieve, R. (2014). Face-to-face or face-to-screen? Undergraduates' opinions and test performance in classroom versus online learning. Frontiers in Psychology, 5, 1278. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01278
  • Kemp, N., Wood, C., & Waldron, S. (2014). do i know its wrong: children's and adults' use of unconventional grammar in text messaging. Reading and Writing, 27, 1585-1602.
  • Wood, C., Kemp, N., & Waldron, S. (2014). Grammatical understanding, literacy and text messaging in school children and undergraduate students: A concurrent analysis. Computers and Education, 70, 281–290.
  • Wood, C., Kemp, N., & Waldron, S. (2014). Exploring the longitudinal relationships between the use of grammar in text messaging and performance on grammatical tasks. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 32, 415-429. doi: 10.1111/bjdp.12049
  • Grace, A., Kemp, N., Martin, F.H., & Parrila, R. (2013). Undergraduates’ attitudes to text messaging language use and intrusions of textisms into formal writing. New Media and Society, 17(5), 792-809. doi:10.1177/1461444813516832
  • Grace, A., Kemp, N., Martin, F.H., & Parrila, R. (2013). Undergraduates’ use of text messaging language: Effects of country and collection method. Writing Systems Research, 4(2), 167-184. doi:10.1080/17586801.2012.712875
  • Howes, L., Kirkbride, P., Kelty, S., Julian, R., & Kemp, N. (2013). Forensic scientists’ conclusions: How readable are they for non-scientist readers? Forensic Science International, 231, 102-112.
  • de Jonge, S., & Kemp, N. (2012). Text-message abbreviations and language skills in high school and university students. Journal of Research in Reading, 35, 49-68.
  • Hokanson, L., & Kemp, N. (2012). Adults’ spelling and understanding of possession and plurality: An intervention study. Reading and Writing, 26, 241-261. doi:10.1007/s11145-012-9366-7
  • Bushnell, C., Kemp, N., & Martin, F.H. (2011). Text-messaging practices and links to general spelling skill. Australian Journal of Educational and Developmental Psychology, 11, 27-38.
  • Kemp, N., & Bushnell, C. (2011). Children’s text-messaging: Abbreviations, input methods, and links with literacy. Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 27, 18-27.
  • Kidd, E., Kemp, N., & Quinn, S. (2011). Did you have a choccie bickie this arvo? A quantitative look at Australian hypocoristics. Language Sciences, 33, 359-368.
  • Mitchell, P., Kemp, N., & Bryant, P. (2011). Variations among adults in their use of morphemic spelling rules and of word-specific knowledge when spelling. Reading Research Quarterly, 46, 119-133.
  • Nguyen, D., Kemp, N., & Want, S.C. (2011). The effects of funny and serious task content and expectations of fun versus importance on children’s cognitive performance. Australian Journal of Psychology, 63, 154-162.

Conference Presentations, Colloquia, and other presentations

  • Kemp, N. (2017, March). Mark's marks: An intervention study on children's use of apostrophes and capital letters. Paper presented at the Language, Literacy and Learning Conference, Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Perth.
  • Kemp, N. (2015, September). Txt msg language: Is it spoiling children's spelling? Paper presented at the CHERI Conference, Children's Hospital at Westmead Education Research Institute, Sydney.
  • Kemp, N. (2015, July). Why don't adults use morphology when spelling nonwords? (And can we make them?) Paper presented at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR), Hawaii, USA.
  • Kemp, N. (2015, April). duz yr child txt?? Children's use of texting language and their literacy skills. Paper presented at the Reading and Spelling: Development, Disorders and Remediation Conference, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Kemp, N. (2015, April). how do i txt my boss??? Written language style and recipient in digital communication. Paper presented at the 42nd Annual Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Sydney.
  • Kemp, N. (2014, April). i no how 2 spell, ok!! Undergraduates' grammatical errors in text-messaging and in standard English. Paper presented at the 41st Annual Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Brisbane.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, November). txtng: Spoiling our spelling, or aiding our expression? Invited colloquium at the MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney (UWS), Sydney.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, November). Do you want a cuppa this arvo? Investigating how and why Australians use diminutive word forms. Invited colloquium at the Macquarie University Reading and Dyslexia Research Group, Department of Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, October). txtng: Spoiling our spelling, or aiding our expression? Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, Oxford Brookes University, London, UK.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, September). Dgtl comunc8n: Does it spell the ruin or the enhancement of literacy skill? Invited colloquium at the Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, University College London (UCL), London, UK.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, July). Can seeing errors affect your spelling? Effects of textese-like and conventional misspellings on nonword spelling. Paper presented at the 20th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR), Hong Kong.
  • Kemp, N. (2013, April). My conf preso: Linguistic and social factors in the use of Australian diminutive word forms. Paper presented at the 40th Annual Australasian Experimental Psychology Conference (EPC), Adelaide.
  • Kemp, N. (2012, November). The effect of misspellings on memory for spelling new words. Invited presentation given at the Warwick Reading Research Group, Coventry, UK.
  • Kemp, N. (2012, November). “Come to a barbie this arvo!” Linguistic and social factors in the use of Australian diminutive word forms. Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
  • Kemp, N. (2012, August). Texting: Spoiling our spelling, or enhancing our expression? Invited presentation given at the Royal Society of Tasmania, Hobart.
  • Kemp, N., Blackley, H., Curé, I., Treiman, B., & Kessler, B. (2012, July). Spelling pseudowords: The effects of task instructions and word likeness. Paper presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR), Montreal, Canada.
  • Kemp, N., Kessler, B., & Treiman, R. (2011, July). Adults’ spelling of doubled consonants in pseudowords. Paper presented at the 18th Annual Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading (SSSR), St Pete Beach, USA.
  • Kemp, N. (2010, November). Spelling intervention with university students: What works and what doesn’t? Invited colloquium at the Department of Psychology, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.

Further Information

Contact Details

Telephone: +61 2 9850 4127
Email : ccd@mq.edu.au
Web : www.ccd.edu.au

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